top of page

From Tanabe to Ealing

The cultural and historical context of Aikido and Gyodokan's lineage.

by Ivan Melo (31.03.2024)

Leia em português.

Leer en español.

IMG_3995.jpg

Morihei Ueshiba 1922

Created in Japan by Morihei Ueshiba, one of the highest exponents of martial arts, Aikido is a deeply Japanese art. It sounds obvious, but to appreciate what that statement means, one has to look past the surface. 

 

Japan has a uniquely rich, complex history and often to western eyes, contradictory beliefs and philosophies. An island nation, living under the mercy of nature’s might, covered by mountains across almost 80% of its territory, it has a profound warrior culture going back to pre history. Its indigenous animistic religion, Shinto (which is far from being a homogenous and systematized religion), was combined with Buddhism (which had already been mixed with many Chinese beliefs such as Daoism, Yin and Yang theory and Confucianism) upon its introduction in the 5th and 6th centuries. Japan was at the eastern end of the Silk Road and its many cultures. 

 

When the military rule takes place in the 13th century with the first Kamakura Shogunate, the foundations to the Samurai warrior culture are laid and Japan will spend the next 400 years in constant internal war. It is around the 14th and 15th century, during periods of peace, that the first teachers and schools of combat are formed and martial arts start to be systematized. It’s during these short peaceful periods that the professional warrior class, the Samurai, start to look at their killing arts as means to develop themselves physically, mentally and spiritually - it’s worth noting that such divisions of the human being, didn’t exist for them, as the pre modern man saw as a whole what modern man sees as separate.

 

Dedicated training halls, or Dojos, didn’t exist, and practice was largely conducted outdoors, in forests and very often in shrine and temple grounds, under the protective eyes of shinto and Buddhist deities. Amongst the various schools of Buddhism, the warrior class had a very close relationship with esoteric buddhism and Zen.  

 

Once the major wars ended with the Tokugawa rule in the early 17th century, the warrior class either became civil servants to the shogunate or, the most gifted in the arts of combat, established their schools across Japan. That is when the first indoor spaces dedicated to martial training are built, especially because now secrecy in busy cities like Edo (present day Tokyo), Osaka, Kyoto are not only a matter of hiding your secrets of combat proficiency, but also to guarantee their particular school financial gains. 

 

During that time the samurai, without having wars to fight,  would travel across Japan to test their proficiency in duels against other martial systems (a practice that only ended in the 1960s). But it is also that time that the warrior class, many now only bureaucrats, got involved even more with the high arts (calligraphy, painting, poetry, tea) and started looking even deeper at their systems as ways to better themselves.

  

Morihei Ueshiba and his Aikido, came at the tail end of the last 1000 years of warrior culture. Born in 1883, after the end of the Samurai rule and at the early stages of Japan’s modernization, he grows up in rural Tanabe, still very much embedded in the deeply spiritual mountains, shrines and temples of Kumano.

 

In his youth, he studies different martial arts (swordsmanship, spear, sumo…), he fights in the russo japanese war, settles in Hokkaido (the equivalent of the wild west at the time) and later meets his two most influential teachers: Onisaburo Deguchi and Sokaku Takeda.

 

Deguchi was a spiritual leader of a new religion called Omoto kyo, which was based on spirit possession practices. Takeda on the other hand, would teach to Morihei his martial art, Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Ueshiba would become his main student for years to come.

 

But it was Deguchi, who had the highest connections with politicians and high ranking military, who recommended his high society connections to study Ueshiba's Aiki Budo. The doors opened to Ueshiba led him to teach members of the imperial family as well as special operations groups of the Japanese Imperial army. It was also Deguchi who would introduce Ueshiba to his far right friends, many of whom would later be recognized as war criminals.  

 

Settling in Tokyo, he opens his dojo, the Kobukan, which would become known as “the hell dojo”. Due to the war and the heavy bombardment of Tokyo, he moves to Iwama in 1942, settling in a small farming community and teaching there. He would travel all over Japan to teach his Aikido after the war, but he lived in Iwama for the rest of his life. 

 

Ueshiba, also known as O Sensei (great teacher) had many students during his 86 years of life, and our lineage descends from one of his most famous students: Kazuo Chiba. 

 

Chiba sensei was born in 1940 and was deeply interested in martial arts, having achieved 2nd Dan in Judo by age 18 and 1st kyu in Karate. In 1958 he sees a picture of O Sensei in a magazine and has the intuition he found his true teacher. He then camps in front of the old Kobukan dojo for 3 days, before O Sensei accepts his request of becoming his disciple.

 

He spends the next 6 years as an uchi deshi (in house apprentice), living in the dojo, training full time and traveling across Japan with O Sensei, assisting him in his lessons and demonstrations. Only the deshis who traveled with O Sensei were required to learn weapons, as he often demonstrated using the sword and staff. Chiba sensei had a special appreciation for weapons training, and O Sensei would encourage it by introducing him to his friends of other arts. It was in this way that Chiba sensei would learn Iaido from the likes of Junichi Haga and Mitsuzuka Takeshi, both direct students of Nakayama Hakudo, the great Iaido, Kendo and Jodo master. 

 

The Aikikai, the organization headed by O Sensei’s son Kisshomaru Ueshiba, starts sending their instructors abroad to introduce Aikido across the globe. It’s in this way that in 1964, Chiba sensei is sent to England. After 10 years in the UK, Chiba sensei returns to Japan and in 1981, invited by his fellow uchi deshi Yoshimitsu Yamada, he joins the ranks of Japanese teachers in the US. 

 

San Diego becomes his base and his first dojo, which would become known as “the pressure cooker”, would attract many devoted practitioners. In 1985, a Londoner of Turkish Cypriot descent named Ismail Hasan lands in San Diego to study directly with Chiba sensei.  

 

Chiba sensei was known, feared and respected for his extremely intensive practice and teaching, but also recognized as a formidable teacher, capable of forming and molding very proficient Aikidoka. The training life of his students was divided between Aikido, weapons, Iaido and Zen meditation. 

 

After nearly 10 intense years as a student of Chiba sensei, 3 of which were training as uchi deshi, Hasan sensei returns to London and shortly after Aikido of London is founded in 1994.  

 

Our dojo, Aikido Gyodokan, starts its activities in London, Ealing, in 2023 under the instruction of Ivan Melo and Cathy Okada, students of Hasan sensei since 2014 and 2018 respectively. 

 

 

Bibliography 

Foundations of Japanese Buddhism Vol1 and Vol2 -  Daigan and Alicia Matsunaga 

Taming of the Samurai – Eiko Ikegami

Chinkon Kinshin (Mediated Spirit Possession in Japanese New Religions) - Birgit Staemmler  

The Catalpa Bow (a Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan) - Carmen Blacker

Legacies of the Sword - Karl F Friday  

Japan’s Ignored Culture Revolution – Allan G. Grapard 

Protocol of the Gods – Allan G. Grapard 

Budo Contemplations – David M. Valadez  

Life Giving Sword: Kazuo Chiba’s Life in Aikido – Liese Klein

Buddhism and Martial Arts in Pre Modern Japan – Steven Trenson 

Tengu (Shamanic and Esoteric Origins of the Japanese Martial Arts) – Roald Knutsen 

Divine Record of Immovable Wisdom and Taia Ki – Takuan Soho 

Complete Musashi (Miyamoto Musashi’ complete writings) – Alexander Bennett  

Daito ryu Aikijujutsu (Conversations with Daito ryu Masters) – Stanley Pranin 

Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind – Shunryu Suzuki 

Zen and the Samurai – DT Suzuki 

 

Online:

Budo: The Way of the Warrior Podcast – David M Valadez (Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud).

https://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/ - articles, translations and interviews

https://www.guillaumeerard.com/ - articles and interviews

De Tanabe a Ealing 

Breve História e contexto cultural do Aikido e a linhagem Gyodokan.

Por Ivan Melo (31.03.2024)

 

Criado no Japão por Morihei Ueshiba, um dos maiores expoentes das artes marciais, o Aikido é uma arte profundamente japonesa. Parece óbvio, mas para apreciar o que essa afirmação significa, é preciso olhar além da superfície.

 

O Japão possui uma história única e complexa e, muitas vezes aos olhos ocidentais, crenças e filosofias contraditórias. Como uma nação insular, vivendo sob terríveis amaeaças naturais (tsunamis, terremotos, erupções vulcânicas e tufões), coberta por montanhas em quase 80% de seu território, possui uma profunda cultura guerreira que remonta à pré-história. Sua religião animista indígena, o Xintoísmo (que está longe de ser uma religião homogênea e sistematizada), foi combinada com o Budismo (que já havia sido misturado com muitas crenças chinesas, como o Taoísmo, a teoria do Yin e do Yang e o Confucionismo) após sua introdução nos séculos V e VI. O Japão estava no extremo oriente da Rota da Seda e de suas muitas culturas. 

Quando o governo militar assume o controle no século XIII com o primeiro Shogunato em Kamakura, são lançadas as bases para a cultura guerreira dos Samurais e o Japão passará os próximos 400 anos em constante guerra interna. É por volta dos séculos XIV e XV, durante períodos de paz, que os primeiros mestres e escolas de combate são formados e as artes marciais começam a ser sistematizadas. É durante esses curtos períodos pacíficos que a classe guerreira profissional, os Samurais, começa a olhar para suas artes de combate como meio de desenvolvimento físico, mental e espiritual - vale ressaltar que tais divisões do ser humano não existiam para eles, pois o homem pré-moderno via como um todo o que o homem moderno vê como separado. 

Salas de treinamento dedicadas, ou Dojos, não existiam, e a prática era amplamente realizada ao ar livre, em florestas e muito frequentemente em santuários e templos, sob os olhos protetores das divindades xintoístas e budistas. Entre as várias escolas de Budismo, a classe guerreira tinha uma relação muito próxima com o budismo esotérico e o Zen. Uma vez que as principais guerras terminaram com o governo Tokugawa no início do século XVII, a classe guerreira se tornou em grande parte burocratas a serviço do xogunato ou, os mais talentosos nas artes do combate, estabeleceram suas escolas por todo o Japão.  

Foi quando os primeiros espaços fechados dedicados ao treinamento marcial foram construídos, especialmente porque agora em cidades movimentadas como Edo (hoje Tóquio), Osaka, Kyoto não era apenas uma questão de esconder seus segredos de proficiência em combate, mas também para garantir os ganhos financeiros de sua escola. 

Durante esse tempo, muitos samurais, sem guerras para lutar, continuaram a viajar por todo o Japão para testar sua proficiência em duelos contra outros sistemas marciais (uma prática que só terminou na década de 1960). Mas também é nesse momento que a classe guerreira, muitos agora apenas servidores públicos, se envolve ainda mais com as altas artes (caligrafia, pintura, poesia, chá) e começa a olhar ainda mais profundamente para seus sistemas como formas de se aprimorarem. 

Morihei Ueshiba e seu Aikido vieram no final dos últimos 1000 anos de cultura guerreira. Nascido em 1883, após o fim do domínio dos Samurais e nos estágios iniciais da modernização do Japão, ele cresceu na rural Tanabe, ainda muito ligado às montanhas profundamente espirituais, santuários e templos de Kumano. 

Em sua juventude, ele estudou diferentes artes marciais (esgrima, lança, sumô ...), lutou na guerra russo-japonesa, estabeleceu-se em Hokkaido (equivalente ao faroeste na época) e mais tarde conheceu seus dois professores mais influentes: Onisaburo Deguchi e Sokaku Takeda. 

Deguchi era um líder espiritual de uma nova religião chamada Omoto Kyo, que se baseava em práticas de possessão espiritual. Takeda, por outro lado, ensinaria a Morihei sua arte marcial, Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Ueshiba se tornaria seu principal aluno por 20 anos. Mas foi Deguchi, que tinha as mais altas conexões com políticos e militares de alta patente, que recomendou suas conexões da alta sociedade para estudar o Aiki Budo de Morihei. As portas abertas para Morihei o levaram a ensinar membros da família imperial, bem como grupos de operações especiais do exército imperial japonês. Foi também Deguchi quem apresentou Ueshiba aos seus amigos da extrema direita, muitos dos quais mais tarde seriam reconhecidos como criminosos de guerra. 

Estabelecendo-se em Tóquio, ele abre seu dojo, o Kobukan, que se tornaria conhecido como "o dojo do inferno". Devido à guerra e aos pesados bombardeios de Tóquio, ele se muda para Iwama em 1942, estabelecendo-se em uma pequena comunidade agrícola e ensinando lá. Ele viajaria por todo o Japão para ensinar seu Aikido após a guerra, mas viveu em Iwama pelo resto de sua vida. 

Ueshiba, também conhecido como O Sensei (grande professor) teve muitos alunos durante seus 86 anos de vida, mas nossa linhagem descendente é de um de seus alunos mais famosos: Kazuo Chiba. 

Chiba sensei nasceu em 1940 e tinha profundo interesse nas artes marciais, tendo alcançado o 2º Dan em Judô aos 18 anos e o 1º kyu em Karatê. Em 1958, ele viu uma foto de O Sensei em uma revista e teve a intuição de que encontrara seu verdadeiro mestre. Ele então acampa na frente do antigo dojo Kobukan por 3 dias, antes que O Sensei aceite seu pedido de se tornar seu discípulo.

Ele passa os próximos 6 anos como uchi deshi (aprendiz interno), vivendo no dojo, treinando em tempo integral e viajando por todo o Japão com O Sensei, auxiliando-o em suas lições e demonstrações. Apenas os deshis que viajavam com O Sensei eram obrigados a aprender armas, já que ele frequentemente fazia demonstrações usando a espada e o bastão. Chiba sensei tinha uma apreciação especial pelo treinamento de armas, e O Sensei o incentivava apresentando-o aos seus amigos de outras artes. Foi dessa forma que Chiba sensei aprendeu Iaido com expoentes como Junichi Haga e Mitsuzuka Takeshi, ambos alunos diretos de Nakayama Hakudo, o grande mestre de Iaido, Kendo e Jodo. 

A Aikikai, a organização liderada pelo filho de O Sensei, Kisshomaru Ueshiba, começa a enviar seus instrutores para o exterior para introduzir o Aikido pelo mundo. Foi dessa forma que, em 1964, Chiba sensei foi enviado para a Inglaterra. Após 10 anos no Reino Unido, Chiba sensei retorna ao Japão e, em 1981, convidado por seu colega uchi deshi Yoshimitsu Yamada, ele se junta às fileiras de professores japoneses nos Estados Unidos. 

San Diego se torna sua base e seu primeiro dojo, que ficaria conhecido como "a panela de pressão", atrairia muitos praticantes dedicados. Em 1985, um londrino de ascendência turca cipriota chamado Ismail Hasan desembarca em San Diego para estudar diretamente com Chiba sensei. 

Chiba sensei era conhecido, temido e respeitado por sua prática e ensino extremamente vigorosos, mas também reconhecido como um professor formidável, capaz de formar e moldar Aikidokas muito proficientes. A vida de treinamento de seus alunos era dividida entre Aikido, armas, Iaido e meditação Zen. 

Depois de quase 10 anos intensos como aluno de Chiba sensei, dos quais 3 foram de treinamento como uchi deshi, Hasan sensei retorna a Londres e pouco depois o dojo “Aikido of London” é fundado em 1994. 

Nosso dojo, Aikido Gyodokan, inicia suas atividades em Londres, Ealing em 2023 sob a instrução de Ivan Melo e Cathy Okada, alunos de Hasan sensei desde 2014 e 2018, respectivamente. 

Bibliography 

Foundations of Japanese Buddhism Vol1 and Vol2 -  Daigan and Alicia Matsunaga 

Taming of the Samurai – Eiko Ikegami

Chinkon Kinshin (Mediated Spirit Possession in Japanese New Religions) - Birgit Staemmler  

The Catalpa Bow (a Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan) - Carmen Blacker

Legacies of the Sword - Karl F Friday  

Japan’s Ignored Culture Revolution – Allan G. Grapard 

Protocol of the Gods – Allan G. Grapard 

Budo Contemplations – David M. Valadez  

Life Giving Sword: Kazuo Chiba’s Life in Aikido – Liese Klein

Buddhism and Martial Arts in Pre Modern Japan – Steven Trenson 

Tengu (Shamanic and Esoteric Origins of the Japanese Martial Arts) – Roald Knutsen 

Divine Record of Immovable Wisdom and Taia Ki – Takuan Soho 

Complete Musashi (Miyamoto Musashi’ complete writings) – Alexander Bennett  

Daito ryu Aikijujutsu (Conversations with Daito ryu Masters) – Stanley Pranin 

Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind – Shunryu Suzuki 

Zen and the Samurai – DT Suzuki 

 

Online:

Budo: The Way of the Warrior Podcast – David M Valadez (Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud).

https://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/ - articles, translations and interviews

https://www.guillaumeerard.com/ - articles and interviews

De Tanabe a Ealing

Breve historia y contexto cultural del Aikido y el linaje de Gyodokan.

Por Ivan Melo (31.03.2024)

Creado en Japón por Morihei Ueshiba, uno de los mayores exponentes de las artes marciales, el Aikido es un arte profundamente japonés. Parece obvio, pero para apreciar lo que esto significa, es necesario mirar más allá de la superficie.

Japón tiene una historia única y compleja y, a menudo, creencias y filosofías contradictorias para los ojos occidentales. Como una nación insular, viviendo a merced de las fuerzas de la naturaleza (tsunamis, terremotos, erupciones volcánicas y tifones), cubierta por montañas en casi el 80% de su territorio, posee una profunda cultura guerrera que se remonta a la prehistoria. Su religión animista indígena, el Shintoismo (que está lejos de ser una religión homogénea y sistematizada), se combinó con el Budismo (que ya había sido mezclado con muchas creencias chinas, como el Taoísmo, la teoría del Yin y el Yang y el Confucionismo) después de su introducción en los siglos V y VI. Japón además estaba en el extremo oriental de la Ruta de la Seda y de sus muchas culturas.

Cuando el gobierno militar tomó el control en el siglo XIII con el primer Shogunato en Kamakura, se sentaron las bases para la cultura guerrera de los Samuráis y Japón pasaría los próximos 400 años en constante guerra interna. Es alrededor de los siglos XIV y XV, durante períodos de paz, que los primeros maestros y escuelas de combate se formaron y las artes marciales comenzaron a ser sistematizadas. Es durante aquellos cortos periodos pacíficos que la clase guerrera profesional, los Samuráis, comienza a ver sus artes de combate como un medio de desarrollo físico, mental y espiritual; aunque cabe destacar que tales divisiones del ser humano no existían para ellos, ya que el hombre premoderno veía como un todo lo que el hombre moderno ve como separado.

Salas de entrenamiento dedicadas, o Dojos, no existían, y la práctica se realizaba ampliamente al aire libre, en bosques y muy frecuentemente en santuarios y templos, bajo los ojos protectores de las divinidades shintoístas y budistas. Entre las varias escuelas de Budismo, la clase guerrera tenía una relación muy cercana con el budismo esotérico y el Zen. Una vez que las principales guerras terminaron con el gobierno Tokugawa a principios del siglo XVII, la clase guerrera se convirtió en gran parte en burócratas al servicio del shogunato o bien, los más talentosos en las artes del combate, establecieron sus escuelas por todo Japón.

Fue entonces cuando se construyeron los primeros espacios cerrados dedicados al entrenamiento marcial, especialmente porque en ciudades ahora bulliciosas como Edo (hoy Tokio), Osaka, Kyoto se trataba no solo de esconder sus secretos de competencia en combate, sino también de asegurar las ganancias financieras de su escuela.

Durante este tiempo, muchos samuráis, sin guerras que librar, continuaron viajando por todo Japón para probar su competencia en duelos contra otros sistemas marciales (una práctica que solo terminó en la década de 1960). Pero también es en este momento que la clase guerrera, con muchos ya convertidos en servidores públicos, se involucra aún más con las altas artes (caligrafía, pintura, poesía, té) y comienza a mirar aún más profundamente sus sistemas como formas de perfeccionamiento.

Morihei Ueshiba y su Aikido llegaron al final de los últimos 1000 años de cultura guerrera. Nacido en 1883, después del fin del dominio de los Samuráis y en las primeras etapas de la modernización de Japón, creció en la rural Tanabe, aún muy ligado a las montañas profundamente espirituales, los santuarios y los templos de Kumano.

En su juventud, estudió diversas artes marciales (esgrima, lanzas, sumo...), luchó en la guerra ruso-japonesa, se estableció en Hokkaido (equivalente al lejano oeste en ese momento) y más tarde conoció a sus dos profesores más influyentes: Onisaburo Deguchi y Sokaku Takeda.

Deguchi era un líder espiritual de una nueva religión llamada Omoto Kyo, que se basaba en prácticas de posesión espiritual. Takeda, por otro lado, enseñaría a Morihei su arte marcial, Daito Ryu Aikijujutsu. Ueshiba se convertiría en su principal alumno durante 20 años. Pero fue Deguchi, quien tenía las conexiones más altas con políticos y militares de alta graduación, quien recomendó a sus conexiones de la alta sociedad que estudiaran el Aiki Budo de Morihei. Las puertas abiertas para Morihei lo llevaron a enseñar a miembros de la familia imperial, así como a grupos de operaciones especiales del ejército imperial japonés. También fue Deguchi quien presentó a Ueshiba a sus amigos de extrema derecha, muchos de los cuales más tarde serían reconocidos como criminales de guerra.

Estableciéndose en Tokio, abrió su dojo, el Kobukan, que se conocería como "el dojo del infierno". Debido a la guerra y los pesados bombardeos de Tokio, se mudó a Iwama en 1942, estableciéndose en una pequeña comunidad agrícola y enseñando allí. Viajó por todo Japón para enseñar su Aikido después de la guerra, pero vivió en Iwama por el resto de su vida.

Ueshiba, también conocido como O Sensei (gran maestro), tuvo muchos alumnos durante sus 86 años de vida, pero nuestra línea descendente proviene de uno de sus alumnos más famosos: Kazuo Chiba.

Chiba sensei nació en 1940 y tenía un profundo interés en las artes marciales, habiendo alcanzado el 2º Dan en Judo a los 18 años y 1º kyu en Karate. En 1958, vio una foto de O Sensei en una revista y tuvo la intuición de que había encontrado a su verdadero maestro. Luego acampó frente al antiguo dojo Kobukan durante 3 días, antes de que O Sensei aceptara su solicitud de convertirse en su discípulo.

Pasó los siguientes 6 años como uchi deshi (aprendiz interno), viviendo en el dojo, entrenando a tiempo completo y viajando por todo Japón con O Sensei, asistiéndolo en sus lecciones y demostraciones. Solo los deshis que viajaban con O Sensei estaban obligados a aprender armas, ya que a menudo hacía demostraciones usando la espada y el bastón. Chiba sensei tenía un aprecio especial por el entrenamiento de armas, y O Sensei lo alentaba presentándolo a sus amigos de otras artes. Fue así como Chiba sensei aprendió Iaido con exponentes como Junichi Haga y Mitsuzuka Takeshi, ambos alumnos directos de Nakayama Hakudo, el gran maestro de Iaido, Kendo y Jodo.

Aikikai, la organización dirigida por el hijo de O Sensei, Kisshomaru Ueshiba, comenzó a enviar a sus instructores al extranjero para introducir el Aikido en todo el mundo. Fue así como, en 1964, Chiba sensei fue enviado a Inglaterra. Después de 10 años en el Reino Unido, Chiba sensei regresa a Japón y, en 1981, invitado por su colega uchi deshi Yoshimitsu Yamada, se une a las filas de profesores japoneses en los Estados Unidos.

San Diego se convierte en su base y su primer dojo, que sería conocido como "la olla a presión", atraería a muchos dedicados practicantes. Luego, en 1985, un londinense de ascendencia turca chipriota llamado Ismail Hasan llega a San Diego para estudiar directamente con Chiba sensei.

Chiba sensei era conocido, temido y respetado por su práctica y enseñanza extremadamente vigorosas, pero también reconocido como un formidable maestro, capaz de formar y moldear Aikidokas muy competentes. La vida de entrenamiento de sus alumnos se dividía entre Aikido, armas, Iaido y meditación Zen.

Después de casi 10 años intensos como alumno de Chiba sensei, de los cuales 3 fueron de entrenamiento como uchi deshi, Hasan sensei regresa a Londres y poco después se funda el dojo "Aikido of London" en 1994.

Nuestro dojo, Aikido Gyodokan, inició sus actividades en Londres, Ealing en 2023 bajo la instrucción de Ivan Melo y Cathy Okada, alumnos de Hasan sensei desde 2014 y 2018, respectivamente.

Bibliografía

Foundations of Japanese Buddhism Vol1 and Vol2 -  Daigan and Alicia Matsunaga 

Taming of the Samurai – Eiko Ikegami

Chinkon Kinshin (Mediated Spirit Possession in Japanese New Religions) - Birgit Staemmler  

The Catalpa Bow (a Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan) - Carmen Blacker

Legacies of the Sword - Karl F Friday  

Japan’s Ignored Culture Revolution – Allan G. Grapard 

Protocol of the Gods – Allan G. Grapard 

Budo Contemplations – David M. Valadez  

Life Giving Sword: Kazuo Chiba’s Life in Aikido – Liese Klein

Buddhism and Martial Arts in Pre Modern Japan – Steven Trenson 

Tengu (Shamanic and Esoteric Origins of the Japanese Martial Arts) – Roald Knutsen 

Divine Record of Immovable Wisdom and Taia Ki – Takuan Soho 

Complete Musashi (Miyamoto Musashi’ complete writings) – Alexander Bennett  

Daito ryu Aikijujutsu (Conversations with Daito ryu Masters) – Stanley Pranin 

Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind – Shunryu Suzuki 

Zen and the Samurai – DT Suzuki 

 

Online:

Budo: The Way of the Warrior Podcast – David M Valadez (Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud).

https://www.aikidosangenkai.org/blog/ - articles, translations and interviews

https://www.guillaumeerard.com/ - articles and interviews

bottom of page